Unique Third Person POV Activity

Guesstimate: How much cash do you think you’re carrying? $______

Empty your pocketbook, tote bag, wallet.

man-with-big-bagFrom the third person point of view (he/she, his/her) write assumptions a stranger might make about the person who carries the items in that pocketbook, tote bag, wallet. For example, what would someone assume about the person’s:

  • Free time
  • Hobbies
  • Habits
  • Work
  • Family
  • Fears
  • Health
  • Values/morals
  • Worldview
  • Health
  • Spirituality
  • Idiosyncrasies

How much cash are you REALLY carrying? How close was your guess – within $5, $10…?

Now that you’ve considered the contents:

  1. What Bible verse, adage, popular title or idiom best describes your findings?
  2. What can you throw away right now?
  3. What surprised you?
  4. What do you want to stop carrying around?
  5. What do you want to start carrying with you?
  6. What do you hope to carry with you always?

By Beth Fowler, author of “Ken’s War.” Visit https://www.facebook.com/kenswar.

Read, Believe, Write!

Beth Fowler headshot

“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.”  Marianne Williamson

Believe it!

Live it!

Beth Fowler, author of the beloved, fast-paced coming-of-age novel “Ken’s War.”

Visit https://www.facebook.com/kenswar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQjZBjqFNzs&feature=youtu.be

 ken's war coverWhen teen rebellion & culture shock collide. Shop here: Ken’s War

Ken’s War is vibrant with authority … Fowler’s elegantly written novel risks exploring the full range of teenage behavior and emotion.” Nancy Springer, award- winning author of YA books.

 

 

 

Advice Writers Can Bank On

Beth Fowler headshot Beginning writers know that they’ll get bylines without bucks from time to time, free copies of magazines in which their works appear, and a few dollars here and there. No pay and low pay are typical during the apprenticeship phase of writing.

Following the advice of paid writers representing nearly 200 years’ experience can advance your career and compensation to the next phase.

Q: What separates paid, published writers from wanna-bes?

A: Discipline, persistence, hard work and the ability to “get back up on the horse” were common responses from the interviewed writers. Francesca Kelly, Tales from a Small Planet editor (www.talesmag.com), says, “You don’t have to have brilliant talent to be published, but you DO have to have incredible persistence.”

Lucy Clark, prolific medical romance writer for Harlequin Mills & Boon (http://www.eharlequin.com.au), is the personification of persistence. “I received the contract for my first book the same day I found out I was pregnant with my daughter. Life happens! It’s hectic. It’s busy, but if we don’t make time for the things that are important to us, we might have regrets later on. I now have two adorable children who commandeer most of my time. I don’t have time for writers’ block. I don’t have time to waste. My stories have to be planned, the research done, so when I sit down, I can build up word count. There’s no such thing as writer’s block – just lack of planning.”

Q.What rumor about the business of writing turned out to be false?

A. Arlene Uslander, editor of The Simple Touch of Fate (www.uslander.net) which has one of my stories in it, discovered three falsehoods on the road to publication. “Once you have a book published, it’s easier to have the next book published and that when you send out a manuscript, no news is good news. And that having an agent accept your work means you’re going to get published.” Not true. Not true. Not true.

Karen Rose Smith (www.karenrosesmith.com) is a fulltime author with about 40 books to her credit. She sold her first book in 1991. “I thought after I sold the first few books, life would become easier! That’s not necessarily true.  After ten books, I remember being stalled and not selling for about ten months.”

Francesca believed that editors were unapproachable. “They’re usually really nice people who are just overworked.” She should know. She’s an approachable and no doubt overworked editor.

Q. What advice do you wish you’d received (or heeded) sooner?

A. Karen Rose Smith learned to “Write to the market. Study the line you want to write for.”

Studying the magazine she wanted to write for had a lot to do with an editor accepting one of Francesca’s articles. Being published in Redbook was a “sudden breakthrough” for her.

“It’s not enough that you have something to say,” is freelance editor and author Karen Schmitt’s advice. “You have to make yourself understood – connect.”

“Rejection isn’t personal,” counsels Megan Hart, an author whose been paid to write for decades. “They’re not rejecting you, they’re rejecting the work.”

“ ‘To be a successful writer, you must write every day,’ ” recalls editor, Dan Case. “I heard this a lot, but really didn’t believe it. When I read Stephen King’s book, On Writing, and he said ‘write everyday,’ I believed it. (Hey, if the King of all writers says it, it must be true.)”

Q. What would you tell a beginner about writing for pay?

A. Writers’ answers ranged from “Don’t write for pay. Write because you love it,” to “Don’t write for FREE!”

Lynn Wasnak, a freelance writer for 25 years, explains that fulltime freelancers urge beginners not to write for free or too cheaply because it allows editors to lower the going rate. Go to https://www.writersmarket.com/assets/pdf/How_Much_Should_I_Charge.pdf.

As for me, I do the writing because I love it. I donate some works to organizations where I volunteer. Otherwise, I sell my work for dollars.

   ***

Article by Beth Fowler, author of the beloved coming-of-age novel “Ken’s War.”

Visit https://www.facebook.com/kenswar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQjZBjqFNzs&feature=youtu.be

 ken's war coverWhen teen rebellion & culture shock collide. Shop here: Ken’s War

Ken’s War is vibrant with authority … Fowler’s elegantly written novel risks exploring the full range of teenage behavior and emotion.” Nancy Springer, award- winning author of YA books.

 

 

 

The Business of Writing and Promoting Your Book

Daisy White - photograph b copy by Daisy White, guest blogger www.daisywhiteauthor.co.uk

 

As an independent bookshop owner and an author, I speak to many writers, who email or turn up in person with copies of their work. I love discovering independent books for the shop (or adding them to the stack by my bed!), but one of the questions I always ask authors is how they will promote their work if I give them an hour for a signing, or buy in some of their titles.

It is at this point that some look bashful and tell me the book is “… only written for friends, and I feel awkward promoting my own work/not sure how social media helps/have limited time.” Others burst forth with a seemingly endless stream of ideas spanning every aspect of their book and themselves. This is not done in a boastful, self-seeking way but simply means they are a) enthusiastic b) can translate that enthusiasm into selling their book.

It isn’t just the marketing that should be approached in a business-like fashion – it is the writing! The most successful writers I know plan their writing year with priority spreadsheets. Short story/poetry competition deadline dates are logged; freelance work is entered into the master plan complete with specific deadlines and requirements; and finally novels-in-progress are given a deadline for submission.

computer-313840_150Time is also allowed for PR/marketing existing works, and any work to be launched that year. This includes signings, radio and TV appearances, interviews, social media, blogs and answering all the emails that drop into your inbox! Make sure to accept last minute queries only if you can meet the deadline and have time to research – one specialist publisher I know is regularly called upon to comment on his subject by the BBC and various National publications because as he puts it, “I make a point of being punctual, polite and research the request to the ‘enth degree!”

It can be very daunting to have a schedule to follow, in addition to the hundred-and-one other things you probably have going on in your life, but by approaching your writing with positivity and determination you can achieve far more than you ever hoped. Another of my favourite authors tells me that for every successful pitch/competition entry/submission you must expect at least twenty unsuccessful ones!

In 2014 I decided to follow the advice above, and treat my writing in the same way I treat my business (which has now won several awards). I made my plan and followed it to the letter, fitting around my job, and my family… and it worked! By the end of the year I had a publisher for my new novel (‘Taming Tigers’ is released in summer 2015 by Melange Books LLC), a regular guest slot on a radio show, and a book review column in a magazine.

Of course I am delighted that the hard work has paid off, so I am already searching for the magic markers and the 2015 calendar to plan my next year…

www.daisywhitesbooktique.co.uk

https://www.facebook.com/DaisyWhiteAuthor

Daisy White – Biog

“Daisy White is a writer, mum, vintage lover, and award-winning literary entrepreneur. As the founder and owner of Daisy White’s Booktique (a pop up independent bookshop with a twist!) she has won business awards, been to speak at Number 10, Downing Street, and continues to support both authors and readers in their creative journeys.

Her writing reflects her years spent travelling, and Daisy has had articles and letters published in various National and local magazines and papers.

Born in the UK, Daisy spent time as child living in Wichita, Kansas, and has fond memories of attending school there (the library was huge!). She now lives in Brighton, on the South coast of England with her husband and two children, but still returns regularly to visit the USA.

In her spare time Daisy competes in ‘mud races’ for charity. These include Hellrunner, Kamikaze, and Downland Devil and if there is a frozen lake to be swum that is just perfect! With her children, Daisy also enjoys browsing the lanes of Brighton for vintage hats and china and taking long family bike rides along the beach.

‘Taming Tigers’ is her YA debut for Fire and Ice (Melange Books).”

Find Daisy on Facebook; https://www.facebook.com/DaisyWhiteAuthor

Hook up on Twitter; https://twitter.com/DaisyWhite1922

Follow on Pinterest; http://uk.pinterest.com/daisywhite1922/

Or check out the website for News, Competitions and Gossip!

(From March 2015) www.daisywhiteauthor.co.uk

Writing Your Writing Goals Makes a Difference

Ruth, left, has met her goals and has written more. Visit https://www.facebook.com/#!/buckleupforbrittany to find out more.

Ruth, left, has met her goals and has written more. Visit https://www.facebook.com/#!/buckleupforbrittany to find out more.

(This blog is based on a writers’ workshop conducted by Beth Fowler)

Do you normally set goals or let things just happen (or just not happen)?

What kinds of things (if any) have you set goals for in the past?

What are some of your beliefs about setting goals?

Which beliefs need to be re-tooled? For example, I was taught, “If you start something you should finish it.” I no longer believe that.

A goal is worthless if ________________(fill in the blank until you run out of ideas).

According to one study, people who write their goals are 42 percent more likely to achieve their goals.

Ruth, shown in the photo, set goals and has taken steps to reach them. See for yourself at https://www.facebook.com/#!/buckleupforbrittany

Cite some examples of how God (or the universe or whatever entity you think runs the big show) has supported your writing goals so far.

Now, write your writing goal and steps you’ll take to reach it.

Be specific when setting your writing goal. Include dates, amounts, numbers, names. Someone else would be able to measure if you achieved your goal because of the objective, concrete way you state it here.

 Example: Send out a query a week for 8 weeks to print magazines that pay freelance writers.

 Example: Submit my story about adopting a baby from China to YorkFest Literary Competition, Spring 2015

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

What steps will you take to reach your goal?

Example: 1. Write rough draft query “template.” 2. Read submission guidelines for magazines. 3. Read articles in targeted magazines. 4. Tailor query to magazine’s guidelines and audience.5. Send queries. 6. Log queries sent and responses received.

 

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

 

Article by Beth Fowler, author of the beloved, coming-of-age novel “Ken’s War.”

Visit https://www.facebook.com/kenswar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQjZBjqFNzs&feature=youtu.be

 ken's war coverWhen teen rebellion & culture shock collide. Shop here: Ken’s War

Ken’s War is vibrant with authority … Fowler’s elegantly written novel risks exploring the full range of teenage behavior and emotion.” Nancy Springer, award- winning author of YA books.