Book Review: The First Earth Day – What Difference Did it Make

In “Before and After the First Earth Day, 1970: A History of Environmentalism, its Success, Failures and Errors” David M. Guion sets out to answer why do we observe Earth Day and what difference does it make that we acknowledge April 22 in this way?

Guion provides an overview of the American zeitgeist, as it pertains to environmentalism, from the time of The Great Depression when frugality was a virtue to the present when consumerism is a part of the American psyche too few people question.

This book is neither a bone-dry history lesson nor a guilt-inducing screed on how we’ve irretrievably screwed up our precious planet. The author has deftly woven together personal anecdotes, passages of quotations, summaries of seminal writings about the environment and more to make his point in an approachable, effective style.

A recounting of how we got this way is important to understand. In our hearts, surely we know there’s something whacky about being urged to recycle while we’re exhorted to shop more to prove our patriotism, about having to hop in a car to get a few groceries because there’s nowhere to shop in our own neighborhoods, about the myriad products in our cupboards and closets that didn’t exist a generation ago.

“Even as some people began to count the costs of America’s new prosperity on the environment, comfort with that same prosperity prevented them from thinking through their concern to its logical conclusion,” Guion writes. We’re living with the results of a disconnect “between the ethos of consumerism with the environmental problem.” Not to mention polarizing politicians, biased journalists, anti-corporate zealots and other non-scientists trying to foment fear and culpability with specious data and fright wigs.

Government policy and huge corporations can be blamed for some of the predicament we’re in today. We might just as well throw up our hands. The gov, big corps, et al are too big for us to influence. But then, as Guion sagely reminds us, governments, corporations, and other so-called faceless entities are made up of individuals. Individuals with faces. Individuals with families they love.

The last chapter “What Now? Who Is Responsible” gives readers a Here’s what you can do list. Some suggestions were novel to me, while others were what readers who are prone to read this kind of book in the first place might label as “common sense.” There’s no such thing as common sense. Just good sense. Fans of unconventional thinking will enjoy the section on using a problem to solve another problem.

Reading about how we’ve missed the mark in stewarding the natural resources of our planet can be disheartening. Even so, the overview “First Earth Day” provides is a reality check, an education, a look back that informs how we deal with day-to-day living now and in the days ahead.

Take heart. The choices individuals make do matter. While that sounds like a bromide, Guion’s thesis challenges readers to ask themselves how individual choices could not have a collective impact.

They have to. Don’t they?

(Beth Fowler is the author of the fast-paced YA Novel Ken’s War)

http://www.fireandiceya.com/authors/bkfowler/kenswar.html

http://www.lulu.com/shop/b-k-fowler/kens-war/paperback/product-21627077

Authors interested in exchanging books for review can contact Beth via this blog.

Ken's War - a fast-paced books for teens and young adults.

Ken’s War – a fast-paced books for teens and young adults.

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Advice Writers Can Bank On

Beth Fowler headshot Beginning writers know that they’ll get bylines without bucks from time to time, free copies of magazines in which their works appear, and a few dollars here and there. No pay and low pay are typical during the apprenticeship phase of writing.

Following the advice of paid writers representing nearly 200 years’ experience can advance your career and compensation to the next phase.

Q: What separates paid, published writers from wanna-bes?

A: Discipline, persistence, hard work and the ability to “get back up on the horse” were common responses from the interviewed writers. Francesca Kelly, Tales from a Small Planet editor (www.talesmag.com), says, “You don’t have to have brilliant talent to be published, but you DO have to have incredible persistence.”

Lucy Clark, prolific medical romance writer for Harlequin Mills & Boon (http://www.eharlequin.com.au), is the personification of persistence. “I received the contract for my first book the same day I found out I was pregnant with my daughter. Life happens! It’s hectic. It’s busy, but if we don’t make time for the things that are important to us, we might have regrets later on. I now have two adorable children who commandeer most of my time. I don’t have time for writers’ block. I don’t have time to waste. My stories have to be planned, the research done, so when I sit down, I can build up word count. There’s no such thing as writer’s block – just lack of planning.”

Q.What rumor about the business of writing turned out to be false?

A. Arlene Uslander, editor of The Simple Touch of Fate (www.uslander.net) which has one of my stories in it, discovered three falsehoods on the road to publication. “Once you have a book published, it’s easier to have the next book published and that when you send out a manuscript, no news is good news. And that having an agent accept your work means you’re going to get published.” Not true. Not true. Not true.

Karen Rose Smith (www.karenrosesmith.com) is a fulltime author with about 40 books to her credit. She sold her first book in 1991. “I thought after I sold the first few books, life would become easier! That’s not necessarily true.  After ten books, I remember being stalled and not selling for about ten months.”

Francesca believed that editors were unapproachable. “They’re usually really nice people who are just overworked.” She should know. She’s an approachable and no doubt overworked editor.

Q. What advice do you wish you’d received (or heeded) sooner?

A. Karen Rose Smith learned to “Write to the market. Study the line you want to write for.”

Studying the magazine she wanted to write for had a lot to do with an editor accepting one of Francesca’s articles. Being published in Redbook was a “sudden breakthrough” for her.

“It’s not enough that you have something to say,” is freelance editor and author Karen Schmitt’s advice. “You have to make yourself understood – connect.”

“Rejection isn’t personal,” counsels Megan Hart, an author whose been paid to write for decades. “They’re not rejecting you, they’re rejecting the work.”

“ ‘To be a successful writer, you must write every day,’ ” recalls editor, Dan Case. “I heard this a lot, but really didn’t believe it. When I read Stephen King’s book, On Writing, and he said ‘write everyday,’ I believed it. (Hey, if the King of all writers says it, it must be true.)”

Q. What would you tell a beginner about writing for pay?

A. Writers’ answers ranged from “Don’t write for pay. Write because you love it,” to “Don’t write for FREE!”

Lynn Wasnak, a freelance writer for 25 years, explains that fulltime freelancers urge beginners not to write for free or too cheaply because it allows editors to lower the going rate. Go to https://www.writersmarket.com/assets/pdf/How_Much_Should_I_Charge.pdf.

As for me, I do the writing because I love it. I donate some works to organizations where I volunteer. Otherwise, I sell my work for dollars.

   ***

Article by Beth Fowler, author of the beloved coming-of-age novel “Ken’s War.”

Visit https://www.facebook.com/kenswar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQjZBjqFNzs&feature=youtu.be

 ken's war coverWhen teen rebellion & culture shock collide. Shop here: Ken’s War

Ken’s War is vibrant with authority … Fowler’s elegantly written novel risks exploring the full range of teenage behavior and emotion.” Nancy Springer, award- winning author of YA books.

 

 

 

ABC’s for Success in any Career (even writing)

Beth Fowler headshot           ABC’s for Writers (and anybody else who works)

 

 

 

 

Aim for decisiveness

Brainstorm frequently

Change for the better

Delegate the task

Educate yourself

Forget “I can’t.”

Generate enthusiasm

Honor commitments

Invent opportunities

Jettison outmoded thinking

Know your customers

Lighten up!

Make new connections

Negotiate sincerely

Optimize quality

Practice unquestionable integrity

Quit unfit habits

Remember goals

Share the bounty

Think entrepreneurially

Understand your mission

Value openness

Win graciously

X-out negativity

Yield to the future

Zap waste

 

 

***

Article by Beth Fowler, author of the beloved coming-of-age novel “Ken’s War.”

Visit https://www.facebook.com/kenswar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQjZBjqFNzs&feature=youtu.be

 ken's war coverWhen teen rebellion & culture shock collide. Shop here: Ken’s War

Ken’s War is vibrant with authority … Fowler’s elegantly written novel risks exploring the full range of teenage behavior and emotion.” Nancy Springer, award- winning author of YA books.

 

 

 

Use My Winning Query as a Model to Pitch Your Article

Beth Fowler headshotSo, you’re ready to pitch your article idea to an editor.

Read each publication’s submission guidelines VERY CAREFULLY, then write a well-researched query letter.

Below is my query that led to a sale. You may use it as a model for your winning query letters.

Dear Jean Ann Duckworth:

I benefit from reading Simple Joy and was especially happy to see an article by my on-line friend Rekha. I believe that an article about breathing would support Simple Joy’s purpose.

We all breathe, but do we breathe properly?

Once we’re aware of our breathing patterns, we can improve them instantly. Women who breathe properly report that they feel “calm, poised, energized, a general well-being, centered, alert, relaxed, open” and similar positive sensations.

Does that sound like a miracle? Because God is in every breath, the benefits of proper breathing are miraculous.

I’d like to share what I’ve learned about breathing with Simple Joy readers. This proposed 1500- to 2000-word feature article (one time rights) will:

 

  • Explain physical and emotional hindrances to proper breathing
  • Guide readers through a breath awareness questionnaire
  • Review the breath’s path through the body
  • Include several easy, effective breathing exercises
  • List hobbies and sports that improve one’s breathing as a side benefit
  • Provide surprising facts and additional resources

 

Earning an instructor’s diploma to teach Qi Gong (or Chi Kung, it’s Chinese for “skill with breath”), speaking to women’s groups on “Better Breathing Means Better Living,” my research on the topic and my firsthand experience in improving my breathing give me the background I need to write credibly and convincingly.

Magazines that have published my works dealing with improving the quality of one’s life include, but aren’t limited to Daily Meditations, Evolving Woman, The Phoenix, New Vegetarian and Natural Health (Australia), Woman at Work (Malaysia), and Her Business (New Zealand).

I can write the article for the general interest issues or slant it as a December (holidays) stress buster.

Sincerely,

Beth Fowler

Blog readers, you’re welcome to use my query as a template or springboard for your unique query. All the best!

***

Article by Beth Fowler, author of the beloved coming-of-age novel “Ken’s War.”

Visit https://www.facebook.com/kenswar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQjZBjqFNzs&feature=youtu.be

 ken's war coverWhen teen rebellion & culture shock collide. Shop here: Ken’s War

Ken’s War is vibrant with authority … Fowler’s elegantly written novel risks exploring the full range of teenage behavior and emotion.” Nancy Springer, award- winning author of YA books.

 

 

 

Tools for Breaking into the Freelance Market

Beth Fowler headshot

If I can do it, you can. Here’s how I’ve broken into the world of getting published & paid.

Freelance writers are not employed on a publication’s staff. Freelancers work on a job-by-job basis and get paid for each project.

Below are writers’ tools and advice from editors to help you open the doors to the freelance market.

 

Contents:

  • Analyzing Magazine and Newspaper “House Style”
  • Submission Guidelines
  • Query Letter    
  • Query Letter Checklist
  • Manuscript Checklist
  • Publishing Business Terms
  • Editors’ Advice for Writers

 Analyzing Magazine and Newspaper “House Style”

 Look at a publication’s table of contents, illustrations and advertisements to determine the targeted readers’:

 

  1. Gender and age range
  2. Marital status
  3. Occupations and income levels
  4. Education levels
  5. Social group
  6. Moral, political, religious outlooks
  7. Main likes and dislikes

Look at several articles in one magazine, or several articles in several issues of the same magazine, to determine:

 

  1. Technique used in most opening paragraphs.
  2. Average number of words per article.
  3. Average number of words per sentence.
  4. Average length of paragraphs.
  5. Vocabulary – informal, academic, slang, jargon, colloquial
  6. Simple or complex sentences.
  7. The extent adjectives and adverbs are used.
  8. The extent of descriptive passages.
  9. Proportion of narrative and quotes.
  10. Proportion of subjective passages (feelings/emotions) and objective passages (facts/data).
  11. Technique used in most concluding paragraphs.
  12. What is the mission of most articles? (educate, entertain, titillate, amuse, persuade, etc.)

****

Submission Guidelines

Always study the submission (or writers’) guidelines before sending a query or article to an editor. Here is an example of guidelines.

THE SATURDAY EVENING POST Guidelines for Submitting Work Writers & Cartoonists

Before submitting work to The Saturday Evening Post, please take the time to read our guidelines for writers

Before sending us a manuscript or query, we hope you will look over past issues of the Post to get an idea of the range and style of articles we publish. You will discover that our main emphasis is health and fitness. Although there are many specialty publications in this field, the Post‘s goal is to remain unique by presenting not only cutting-edge news but by combining this with information of practical use to our readers.

Major freelance contributions in recent years include: “Hats On For Health: A Skin-Cancer Warning from Down Under,” about the advanced skin-cancer-prevention program in Australia, and “Munchausen by Proxy: The Deadly Game,” about a little-understood but prevalent psychological disorder that can be devastating to children.

In addition to health-related articles, the Post buys humor and anecdotes suitable for “Post Scripts,” as well as cartoons, illustrations, and photos. Payment ranges from $15 for Post Scripts to $25-$400 for most feature articles.

Our nonfiction needs include how-to, useful articles on gardening, pet care and training, financial planning, and subjects of interest to a family-oriented readership. For nonfiction articles, indicate any special qualifications you have for writing about the subject, especially for technical or scientific material. Include one or two published clips with your query. We prefer typed manuscripts between 2,500 and 3,000 words in length. We generally buy all rights.

Although we seldom publish new fiction, our readers enjoy upbeat stories that stress traditional relationships and family values. A light, humorous touch is appreciated. We are also always in need of straight humor articles. Make us laugh and we’ll buy it.

We respond quickly to queries, normally within three weeks. If you do send the whole manuscript, either (1) include a sufficiently stamped and sized SASE for its return should we decide not to use it; or (2) indicate you do not want the material returned and include an SASE with appropriate postage for a reply. Please send typed, double-spaced copy. We normally respond to manuscript submissions within six weeks. You are free to submit the article simultaneously elsewhere.

Feature articles average about 2,000 words. We like positive, fresh angles to Post articles, and we ask that they be thoroughly researched.

Please submit all medical/fitness articles to Cory SerVaas M.D.; travel queries and articles to Holly Miller, Travel Editor; fiction to Fiction Editor; and Post Scripts to Steve Pettinga.

1100 Waterway Blvd. Indianapolis, IN 46202 (317) 634-1100

***

Query Letter

 

Note: This emailed query letter was successful. You may use it as model for your projects. Snail mailed queries should include your telephone number, email address and a pre-addressed, stamped return envelope.

Dear Jean Ann Duckworth:

I benefit from reading Simple Joy and was especially happy to see an article by my friend Rekha. I believe that an article about breathing would support Simple Joy’s purpose.

We all breathe, but do we breathe properly?

Once we’re aware of our breathing patterns, we can improve them instantly.ghuū Women who breathe properly report that they feel “calm, poised, energized, a general well-being, centered, alert, relaxed, open” and similar positive sensations.

Does that sound like a miracle? Because God is in every breath, the benefits of proper breathing are miraculous.

I’d like to share what I’ve learned about breathing with Simple Joy readers. This proposed 1500- to 2000-word feature article (one time rights) will:

 

  • Explain physical and emotional hindrances to proper breathing
  • Guide readers through a breath awareness questionnaire
  • Review the breath’s path through the body
  • Include several easy, effective breathing exercises
  • List hobbies and sports that improve one’s breathing as a side benefiProvide surprising facts and additional resources.

I can write the article for the general interest issues or slant it as a December (holidays) stress buster. Earning an instructor’s diploma to teach Qi Gong (or Chi Kung, it’s Chinese for “skill with breath”), speaking to women’s groups on “Better Breathing Means Better Living,” my research on the topic and my firsthand experience in improving my breathing give me the background I need to write credibly and convincingly.Magazines that have published my works dealing with improving the quality of one’s life include, but aren’t limited to Daily Meditations, Evolving Woman, The Phoenix, New Vegetarian and Natural Health (Australia), Woman at Work (Malaysia), and Her Business (New Zealand).

Sincerely,

Beth Fowler

 

 

Query Letter Checklist

__ Return address – your name, address, phone number, fax and email address.

__ Address to proper editor, spell name correctly.

__ One-page letter (two if absolutely necessary) of 3 – 4 paragraphs.

__ Letter is concise, polished, courteous, written in business format, yet “human”.

__ Check spelling and grammar. (Donut really on word processor’s spill chick.)

__ SASE large enough with postage for reply or a contract!

__ Queries – business-size SASE for agent’s or editor’s response.

Manuscript Checklist

__ Follow writers/submission guidelines.

­­__ 12p font, Times New Roman, double spaced on 8 ½ x 11, one side only.

__ Proofread for spelling and grammar. (Due note rely on computer spell Chuck.)

__ Capitalize first letter of first word, and rest of words unless small (to, of, in) in chapt titles.

__ Approx 1 inch margins all around.

__ No italics. Underline instead.

__ No handwritten corrections.

__ Mag/newspaper manuscripts: Top left corner – 1st p single-space name, address, tel, fax, mobile, email. Mr/Miss/Mrs if first name is unisex. Top right corner – word count, rights offered, dept or column if applies. Drop down ½ way. Center title, By and name. Every p thereafter: Top left corners – last name & keyword of title. Top right corners – p number. Follow the submission guidelines if they differ from this.

­­__ Book ms: Title p with title, address, wc. Every p thereafter: Top left corners – last name & keyword of title. Top right corners – p number. New p for new chapt, drop down 1/3 –1/4.

­­__ End at end.

__ No                                                                                                  “widows”.
***

Publishing Business Terms

ADVANCE: $ pub pays author for book under contract, i.e. ½ paid at signing, ½ at delivery of final ms. Author doesn’t receive more $ until proceeds ($ales) exceed amount of advance.

BACKLIST: books from previous seasons still in print.

COMMISSION: advance payment from publisher to author asked (commissioned) to write something

COPYRIGHT: designates ownership of work. Most pubs © in author’s name, so when work goes out of print rights revert to author who may resell ms to another publisher.

COVER LETTER: accompanies solicited ms sent to agent or publisher.

FLAT FEE: “work-for-hire.” Lump sum for work. No royalties.

FRONTLIST: books published in current season and in publisher’s current catalogue.

INSTITUTIONAL SALES: books sold to schools/libraries, roughly 25% of kids lit is bought by libraries.

MASS MARKET: “rack-sized”, paperbacks smaller than trade paperbacks, usually different cover than hardcover edition, and cheaper.

MASS MARKET PUBLISHERS: companies that produce large quantities of paperbacks inexpensively, titles follow trends that fit markets – tie-ins with movies, TV characters and toys. Sell high volume in short time.

NET PRICE: “wholesale price”, $ pub receives from each book sale after discounts given to bookstores/buyers. Some pubs base author’s royalty on net price.

PROPOSAL: document author sends to agent/pub describing proposed book, length, audience, table of contents, chapt outline, first 3 chapts, competing titles, ways to market book, author’s credentials.

QUERY LETTER: letter author writes seeking permission to send ms to agent/pub.

RETAIL PRICE: cover price on book. Most big pubs pay royalties based on cover price.

ROYALTIES: 3-15% of proceeds from the sale of each copy of book.

SASE: self-addressed stamped envelope

SELF PUBLISH: Author pays for publication. Companies offer different levels of service. Authors must do a lot of marketing themselves.

SUBSIDIARY RIGHTS: pub/agent sells book to foreign pubs, mags, movie studios. If pub sells rights, $ split with author (usually 50/50). If agent sells rights, author keeps proceeds minus agent’s commission.

SUBSIDY PUBLISHER: “vanity publisher”, pubs that charge authors $$$$$ to publish ms. Avoid.

TRADE PAPERBACK: bound with heavy paper, usually same size and cover art as hardback, cheaper.

TRIM SIZE: outer dimensions of book.

UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS: ms sent to pubs who didn’t request them. Often rejected, languish in “slush pile”.

***

Editors’ Advice for Writers

 

 

Beginning writers know that they’ll get bylines without bucks from time to time, free copies of magazines in which their works appear, and a few dollars here and there. No pay and low pay are typical during the apprenticeship phase of writing.

 

Following the advice of paid writers representing nearly 200 years’ experience can advance your career and compensation to the next phase.

 

Q: What separates paid, published writers from wanna-bes?

 

A: Discipline, persistence, hard work and the ability to “get back up on the horse” were common responses from the interviewed writers. Francesca Kelly, Tales from a Small Planet editor (www.talesmag.com), says, “You don’t have to have brilliant talent to be published, but you DO have to have incredible persistence.”

 

Lucy Clark, prolific medical romance writer for Harlequin Mills & Boon (http://www.eharlequin.com.au), is the personification of persistence. “I received the contract for my first book the same day I found out I was pregnant with my daughter. Life happens! It’s hectic. It’s busy, but if we don’t make time for the things that are important to us, we might have regrets later on. I now have two adorable children who commandeer most of my time. I don’t have time for writers’ block. I don’t have time to waste. My stories have to be planned, the research done, so when I sit down, I can build up word count. There’s no such thing as writer’s block – just lack of planning.”

 

  1. What rumor about the business of writing turned out to be false?

 

  1. Arlene Uslander, editor of The Simple Touch of Fate (www.uslander.net) which has one of my stories in it, discovered three falsehoods on the road to publication. “Once you have a book published, it’s easier to have the next book published and that when you send out a manuscript, no news is good news. And that having an agent accept your work means you’re going to get published.” Not true. Not true. Not true.

 

Karen Rose Smith (www.karenrosesmith.com) is a fulltime author with about 40 books to her credit. She sold her first book in 1991. “I thought after I sold the first few books, life would become easier! That’s not necessarily true.  After ten books, I remember being stalled and not selling for about ten months.”

 

Francesca believed that editors were unapproachable. “They’re usually really nice people who are just overworked.” She should know. She’s an approachable and no doubt overworked editor.

 

  1. What advice do you wish you’d received (or heeded) sooner?

 

Karen Rose Smith learned to “Write to the market. Study the line you want to write for.”

 

Studying the magazine she wanted to write for had a lot to do with an editor accepting one of Francesca’s articles. Being published in Redbook was a “sudden breakthrough” for her.

 

“It’s not enough that you have something to say,” is freelance editor and author Karen Schmitt’s advice. “You have to make yourself understood – connect.”

 

“Rejection isn’t personal,” counsels Megan Hart, an author whose been paid to write for decades. “They’re not rejecting you, they’re rejecting the work.”

 

“ ‘To be a successful writer, you must write every day,’ ” recalls editor, Dan Case. “I heard this a lot, but really didn’t believe it. When I read Stephen King’s book, On Writing, and he said ‘write every day,’ I believed it. (Hey, if the King of all writers says it, it must be true.)”

 

  1. What would you tell a beginner about writing for pay?

 

  1. Writers’ answers ranged from “Don’t write for pay. Write because you love it,” to “Don’t write for FREE!”

 

Lynn Wasnak, a freelance writer for 25 years, explains that fulltime freelancers urge beginners not to write for free or too cheaply because it allows editors to lower the going rate. Go to https://www.writersmarket.com/assets/pdf/How_Much_Should_I_Charge.pdf.

 

As for me, I do the writing because I love it. I donate some works to organizations where I volunteer. Otherwise, I sell my work for dollars.

 

And so can you!

 

***

By Beth Fowler, author of the beloved coming-of-age novel “Ken’s War.”

Visit https://www.facebook.com/kenswar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQjZBjqFNzs&feature=youtu.be

 ken's war coverWhen teen rebellion & culture shock collide. Shop here: Ken’s War

Ken’s War is vibrant with authority … Fowler’s elegantly written novel risks exploring the full range of teenage behavior and emotion.” Nancy Springer, award- winning author of YA books.

 

 

 

Use My Winning Query as a Launchpad to Pitch Your Novel

Beth Fowler headshot            So, you’re ready to pitch your book to literary agents.

Read each agency’s submission guidelines VERY CAREFULLY.

Some agents want the first chapter with the query. Some want a chapter-by-chapter synopsis. Others will specify how many paragraphs should be in the query and what is to be contained in each paragraph. Hardly any want attachments with emailed queries.

Below is my query for Ken’s War, published by Melange Books, LLC. The info between parentheses describes what the content will be for each segment of the query letter.

(Address agent by name who reads queries in your genre) Dear Kaitlin Portergiss:

(State why you chose this agency or how you know about it. I should have written a tad more about how my book fits their stated requirements and preferences.) I reviewed your requirements in Jeff Herman’s Guide and also on your website.

(List what is in query and attached.) Attached, as requested, you’ll find 20 pages from Ken’s War, a 50,000-word YA novel.

(Hook that includes setting, protagonist, conflict and mini-synopsis.) It’s 1965 and army brat Ken knows how the world works. So imagine how his world splinters when, because of his misbehavior, Ken and his father are whisked off to a remote outpost in Japan.

Think of being immersed in a foreign culture, of learning that your mother back in Pennsylvania has replaced you and your dad, of discovering that you don’t know how the world works. While avoiding his dad as much as possible, Ken feels justified in lying to and stealing from the people – Japanese and Americans – who care about him. In a subplot, Captain Paderson leads an investigation into stolen army supplies appearing on the black market. After spending the night at a festival with his forbidden Japanese girlfriend, Ken returns to confront the man he believes is his greatest enemy. “Why did you lie?” his father asks. “Because I didn’t want to have to beat you up,” Ken replies. He learns firsthand about “dirt bags” and heroes, about betrayal and family loyalty, and about first love and broken hearts. He and his father return to Pennsylvania after Paderson receives a medal for breaking up the black market. Although Ken is caught stealing, realizing that his father is a hero is the true journey for Ken.

(Target readers) Ken’s War is for teen readers who crave character-driven novels involving high stakes, that follow the traditional arc, and honestly portray emotional undercurrents, lightly spiced with humor. A crossover audience of baby boomers will identify with the protagonist and the time.

(Author’s credentials.) I’ve lived in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, home of the U.S. Army War College, and “army brats” were my pals. Later, I worked professionally with army personnel. Like the protagonist, I’ve been uprooted from Yankee soil to live in the Far East where enduring culture shock was a daily challenge. The book is NOT based on my life. Over 400 of my articles and short stories have been published here and internationally. Oxford University Press published two anthologies of my stories. My novel The Dressmaker’s Dummy was published by Denlinger’s, which folded. I’ve taught fiction and nonfiction writing in the U.S.A. and abroad. I edited the nonfiction book The Stress Elimination Handbook (Ibis Press).

Thank you for reading this. I look forward to your reply.

Sincerely,

 

Beth Fowler

(tel no.)

Blog readers, you’re welcome to use my query as a template or springboard for your unique query. All the best!

***

Article by Beth Fowler, author of the beloved coming-of-age novel “Ken’s War.”

Visit https://www.facebook.com/kenswar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQjZBjqFNzs&feature=youtu.be

 ken's war coverWhen teen rebellion & culture shock collide. Shop here: Ken’s War

Ken’s War is vibrant with authority … Fowler’s elegantly written novel risks exploring the full range of teenage behavior and emotion.” Nancy Springer, award- winning author of YA books.

 

 

 

Lit Agent Reveals How to Avoid 10 Near-Fatal Errors

 

N

10. The Everything-but Writer. You’d be surprised at many people hang around this writing community who know everything there is to know about writing, about marketing, about publishing, but never actually get themselves settled in their chair to write. They Facebook, they Twitter, they create queries and maybe even proposals, but they never manage to get down to the sometimes-drudgery of writing a whole book.

Antidote: Start eating the proverbial elephant, one bite at a time. Stop playing at being a writer and start producing.

9. The Assertive Writer. In this industry, it sometimes feels as if we need to rattle cages and demand some attention. Resist the urge. It’s dangerous to do anything that may earn you the label of “difficult.” It’s a small world and editors move around. Few things will damage your career quite so fast.

Antidote: Let your agent do the heavy lifting so you can remain unscathed.

8. The Know-It-All Writer. Nothing is as unattractive as a writer who is always right. This usually crops up during the editing process and can earn you a reputation faster than you can say syntax error.

Antidote: Pray that you’ll always keep a learner’s attitude. Getting a book published is a team effort. Value your team.

7. The Judgmental Writer. How many times have you heard a new writer denigrating the work of someone who helped blaze the trail? All too often. Under the guise of literary criticism, we often rip our colleagues to shreds. Some of those writers we criticize have hundreds of thousands of readers. We are also demeaning those readers. What does that buy us? There is nothing inherently better in one type of storytelling over another. Literary is not “better” than commercial fiction.

Antidote: Learn from the successful writers instead of disparaging them.

6. The Lone Ranger Writer. Some of the more timid writers among us would love to hole up in their writing cocoons and simple shut out the world. Unfortunately, in this day, that’s not possible. Publishers expect us to connect, to network and to partner with them on promotion.

Antidote: Even before you are published begin to connect with potential readers and potential colleagues.

5. The Writer/Artiste. Suffering from the “vapours” and “waiting on the Muse” went out with the Victorian dime novels. Writing is a career—a business. Yes, it is also an art, but as someone who’s made a living as a successful artist, I can assure you that you have to harness your creativity with discipline in order to produce.

Antidote: Practice discipline—the spiritual disciplines and the discipline of regular work habits. Don’t let emotions derail your God-given creativity.

4. The Jack-of-All Trades Writer. Don’t be the writer who resists being “branded.” How many times have I heard, “I write it all—fiction, nonfiction, Children’s picture books and poetry.” I could write a whole book on this. Think of yourself as a river. Which do you think makes the biggest impact: a wide, meandering, shallow stream; or a deep, narrow, swift-moving river?

Antidote: Focus!

3. The Bottom-Line Writer. If it’s all about the bottom line, you’re in the wrong business. I’m not saying that you can’t have a financially successful career as a writer but it’s much like choosing to be an actor. It’s tough in the early years to get steady employment and it’s always a buyers’ market. You’ve heard the advice, “Don’t quit your day job.” It’s true. It takes a number of years to work up to a good steady income. The pressure of trying to make an unrealistic income will compromise your art.

Antidote: Check your expectations against reality. And don’t quit your day job too soon.

2. The Head-in-the-Sand Writer. Every career move has potential pitfalls. Each contract has the potential for failure built in. A writer needs to be aware that if his sales numbers are low, he’s going to have a harder time making each subsequent sale.

Antidote: Your agent will weigh the pros and cons of every career decision carefully, trying to insure success on a project-by-project basis. Be aware.

1. The Impatient Writer. This industry moves at a snail’s pace and it seems to get slower every year. There’s very little that can be done to speed it up—everyone is overworked and understaffed. If a writer tries to push, he’ll very likely push himself off the desk and into the round file.

Antidote: Wait on the Lord. Practice patience. There’s no way to speed things up so there’s no sense of beating one’s head against the wall needlessly.

***

provided by Beth Fowler, author of the beloved coming-of-age novel “Ken’s War.”

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 ken's war coverWhen teen rebellion & culture shock collide. Shop here: Ken’s War

Ken’s War is vibrant with authority … Fowler’s elegantly written novel risks exploring the full range of teenage behavior and emotion.” Nancy Springer, award- winning author of YA books.